FACTS ABOUT CHRISTMAS

DID YOU KNOW?

According to data analyzed from Facebook posts, two weeks before Christmas is one of the two most popular times for couples to break up. However, Christmas Day is the least favorite day for breakups.

Christmas stockings allegedly evolved from three sisters who were too poor to afford a marriage dowry and were, therefore, doomed to a life of prostitution. They were saved, however, when the wealthy Bishop Saint Nicholas of Smyrna (the precursor to Santa Claus) crept down their chimney and generously filled their stockings with gold coins.

The “Twelve Days of Christmas ” gifts: A partridge in a pear tree, two turtledoves, three French hens, four calling birds, five gold rings, six geese laying, seven swans swimming, eight maids milking, nine ladies dancing, ten lords leaping, eleven pipers piping, and twelve drummers drumming. There are 364 gifts altogether, one for everyday of the year.

THE word Noel derives from the French expression “les bonnes nouvelles” or “the good news”.

THE abbreviation Xmas isn’t irreligious. The letter X is a Greek abbreviation for Christ.

THE world’s tallest Xmas tree at 221ft high was erected in a Washington shopping mall in 1950.

MANY theologians estimate that Jesus wasn’t born on December 25 but sometime in September between 6BC and 30AD.

JAMES Pierpont’s 1857 song Jingle Bells was first called One Horse Open Sleigh and was written for Thanksgiving.

THE Greeks celebrate Christmas on January 7, according to the old Julian calendar, while Xmas presents are opened on New Year’s Day.

MANY parts of the Christmas tree can actually be eaten, with the needles being a good source of Vitamin C.

THE holly in a wreath symbolises Christ’s crown of thorns while the red berries are drops of his blood.

THE word Christmas comes from the Old English “Cristes maesse” meaning “Christ’s Mass”.

BOXING Day gets its name from all the money collected in church alms-boxes for the poor.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s